Search for tag 'Human resources management'

23 results Number of Results per Page
  1. Half of all Belgian employees do not know how much supplementary pension they receive

    Although the importance of a supplementary pension has gradually become widely understood, the amount of the annual employer contribution is greatly overestimated. More than one employee in two (54%) has no idea what contribution their employer pays into this so-called second pillar. More and clearer communication becomes in this way an important attention point. This communication employees want above all digitally and via a single central platform. This is the lesson of a survey by Vlerick Business School and AG Insurance.

  2. Leadership development remains top priority for HR departments

    The main priority for Belgian human resources departments continues to be the development of the competencies of managers, i.e. leadership development, as the HR Barometer study by HR consultancy Hudson and Vlerick Business School reveals. Talent management – the attraction, development and motivation of talent in the organisation – is still ranked a clear second.

  3. Fortis BNP Paribas: a new uncertainty

    The historical decision to nationalise the activities should have been the start of a new beginning for Fortis Bank. However, in this second part of the case it becomes clear that it was only the start of a prolonged period of additional uncertainty, characterized by legal wrangling, disgruntled shareholders, rumours and misinformation.

  4. Fortis: in the eye of the storm

    From the year 2007, the effects of the crisis that hit the financial sector were felt hard and painfully by many organisations. The Fortis Holding, a Belgian Dutch service provider in banking and insurance, was no exception. The first part of the case starts with the historical decision to (partly) nationalise the activities of the Fortis holding by the Dutch, Luxemburg and Belgian state. Throughout the case emphasis is placed on the various human consequences and emotions, triggered by the events.

  5. Open innovation in HR

    Wanted: the people behind open innovation

    More and more businesses are opting for an open innovation strategy, where they decide to look outside their own organisation and cooperate with research centres, companies or other partners. So far, the human aspect is often overlooked. Promoting open innovation actually requires specific people management practices and an adapted business culture. So how can organisations promote open innovation with the right human elements?

  6. Private equity

    Private Equity, HRM and Employment - Balancing the debate

    Discussions concerning private equity practices are often highly-charged – with proponents arguing that private equity deals create value, and critics characterising private equity firms as ‘sharks’ looking for quick profits at the expense of workers. Mike Wright, Nick Bacon, Rod Ball, and Miguel Meuleman offer a more balanced, systematic view of what private equity is all about with regard to employment relations.

  7. JPG

    “It remains quite a challenge to fill vacancies”

    The world of recruitment and selection is in constant movement. The job market is shrinking day by day and the available candidates are asking different questions compared to the past. Research into new trends in selection and recruitment at Vlerick Business School commissioned by Federgon illustrates the main challenges for the future.

  8. JPG

    Love them or lose them - retaining KPMG employees

    This is part of a case series. In the second part of this case, we revisit KPMG after a decade. Currently absenteeism is too high. Furthermore, KPMG loses their employees in the first two years, so just after they’ve been fully trained and start being profitable. The goal is clear: decrease employee turnover and increase the average tenure with three years.

  9. JPG

    Attract the brightest - recruitment at KPMG

    This is part of a case series. As part of his new job as the HR director at KPMG Belgium, Martin Blanc is asked to attract a large, stable number of people during the next couple of years. In the second part of this case, we revisit KPMG after a decade. Currently absenteeism is too high. Furthermore, KPMG loses their employees in the first two years, so just after they’ve been fully trained and start being profitable. The goal is clear: decrease employee turnover and increase the average tenure with three years.

  10. Stimulating learning in the organisation

    Competency development in times of crisis

    Starting in the second half of 2008, Flanders was confronted with its most serious economic crisis in decades. In 2009, the economy contracted by 3.9%. The economic crisis also had implications for the way in which organisations develop their employees’ competencies. Budgetary cut-backs in training programmes compelled companies to look for new, more creative ways to develop their employees’ competencies and thus to guarantee their continued effectiveness.

23 results Number of Results per Page