Search for tag 'Sales'

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  1. e-business

    How to Plan E-Business Initiatives in Established Companies

    Many large and mature companies — which still form most of the economy — have difficulty analysing the opportunities and difficulties created by the Internet. Vlerick Professor of Marketing and Digital Strategy, Steve Muylle, and Amit Basu, Professor of Information Systems at the Cox School of Business (Dallas, Texas), have developed a planning process that puts e-business into perspective and helps make it manageable.

  2. Butterfly

    From caterpillar to butterfly

    Increasingly, instead of just offering products or services, companies are integrating different products, services and technologies to provide solutions that are specifically designed to respond to customer demands and requirements. However, transforming from a product or service provider to a genuinely customer-centred solution provider implies re-aligning the entire organisation.

  3. Case study

    Value added services at ABC Industries

    These two cases are part of a case series. These cases highlight how important it is to factor the needs of the customers in developing and commercializing value-added-services.

  4. Atlas Copco

    Distributor management at Atlas Copco

    Atlas Copco is a world renowned engineering organisation known for its quality, innovative products. Split up into three main business areas, this particular case deals with one of the business areas, Construction and Mining Technique (CMT).

  5. B2B Brand Architecture: Building and sustaining customer trust

    B2B Brand Architecture: building and sustaining customer trust

    The importance of branding and brand architecture is well established in business-to-consumer (B2C) settings. But in business-to-business (B2B) settings, managers tend to believe that personal selling is the key, and brand building tends to be overlooked.
    However, authors Steve Muylle, Niraj Dawar and Deva Rangarajan argue that B2B branding and personal selling should be seen as complements, rather than as an either/or choice.

  6. picture of graphs

    Sales people would not recommend their company or job to others

    In general, people performing a sales function are quite satisfied. However, they would not recommend their company to others looking for a sales job. This is the surprising conclusion of a recent study on sales force effectiveness conducted by Professor Deva Rangarajan, head of the Sales Management Forum at Vlerick Business School. The findings are based on qualitative interviews with both senior sales executives and sales people in the field from over 40 companies, combined with a quantitative online questionnaire.

6 results Number of Results per Page