Why this programme?

Transferring a company successfully is not an easy accomplishment, and yet it is crucial to take time for the important questions. Questions and plans that you can discuss with only a few people. This programme will enable you to:

  • Ask the right strategic questions concerning a sale or transfer
  • Consider all possible alternatives
  • Identify the right buyer or transfer recipient
  • Draw up a clear step-by-step plan for preparing your company
  • Prepare your company for a transfer
  • Calculate a value for your company
  • Understand and guide your external advisors in this process
  • Find your way in the main legal documents
  • Apply negotiation techniques
  • Avoid familial conflicts
  • Use your assets and experience meaningfully after the transaction

In addition, you join the extensive network of Vlerick Alumni.

Why this programme?

Need help?

Contact our Programme Advisor
Programme Advisor
Tel + 32 9 210 98 84
[email protected]
Find the programme most relevant for you!

Download our programme calendar

Meet Us

Info Sessions & Open Days
10 Dec
Drop In on our Ghent Campus
Category: General Info Sessions

14 Jan
Drop In on our Brussels Campus
Category: General Info Sessions

10 Mar
Drop In on our Leuven Campus
Category: General Info Sessions

No. 1 for Executive Education

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