Detailed Programme

The programme ‘Leading Innovation in Healthcare’ explores the impact new technology, digital transformation and organisational innovation can have in today’s healthcare sector. The programme consists of 3 modules:

Module 1: The challenges and complexities of patient-centric systems

We start discussing about the roles patients, families and caregivers can play in a patient-centric system. We look at how standardising protocols and methods could give us more consistent levels of treatment and cure. And we explore the roles different stakeholders play in personalised medicine.

You’ll gain a deep understanding of whole health systems, their funding processes and how they are organised form a patient’s perspective. You’ll also start to assess your own organisation and identify where it fits in the health services ecosystem.

Module 2: Using technology to lower costs and give patients value

Value-based healthcare is about giving patients the best quality care while lowering costs. In this second session, we discuss both the health and economic impact that new technology can have.

Care pathways are increasingly using advanced technology to improve their therapeutic, diagnostic and operational capacity, quality and speed. But cost-effectiveness isn’t the only reason to invest in technology. Robotics, 3D printing, m-health and advanced AI diagnosis can all vastly improve patient care and treatment outcomes. But before we can use data and evidence to improve healthcare for the future, we need to become far more willing to share information.

Module 3: Capturing value

To get the most value for their organisation, senior health leaders need to be able to negotiate. To create value for the patient it is important to span the whole of the health ecosystem, organisations from healthcare payers to medical providers need to collaborate – despite their competing interests.

Module 4: Strategising beyond the market

Companies think strategically about their positioning in the healthcare market, but they often neglect to do the same beyond the market. However, to improve performance, it’s important to integrate your market and non-market strategies. We will focus on identifying your organisation’s non-market issues and how to develop a non-market strategy.

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

The challenges and complexities of patient-centric systems

Using technology to lower costs and give patients value

Capturing value

Strategising beyond the market

Drive real change in your organisation

A learning experience with real impact on your operations? A management programme tailored to the specific needs of your business? Contact us and discover how we can design and deliver customised programmes for your team that add genuine value to your organisation.

Need help?

Contact our Programme Advisor
Programme Advisor
Tel + 32 9 210 98 84
[email protected]
Find the programme most relevant for you!

Download our programme calendar

Meet Us

Info Sessions & Open Days
20 May
Meet our programme advisor online
Category: General Info Sessions

08 Jun
Meet our programme advisor online
Category: General Info Sessions

Our approach to learning

It’s all about you and your company’s challenges at Vlerick Business School. Discover our unique approach to learning!

Vlerick expertise in Healthcare Management

  1. Price transparency for innovative medicines does not result in lower prices for everyone

    Although it seems counterintuitive, a new simulation model shows that, without confidential price agreements, lower income countries will pay up to 12% higher prices and gain access to innovative medicines far later than richer countries. This conclusion goes against the assumption that total transparency about price agreements for new and innovative medicines for diseases with high unmet need would lead to more competition, lower prices for all, and greater availability of these medicines for more patients in more countries.
  2. European emergency health fund is needed to limit the impact of future crises

    The unprecedented public health crisis caused by COVID-19 overstretched the structures and mechanisms of the European Union, in particular those that deal with emergencies. There is a need for deeper union and collaboration across the European health care sector, as well as a need for a significant financial cushion for rapid and predictably increasing funding. In their new policy paper, Professor David Veredas, Professor Simon Ashby and doctoral researcher Dimitrios Kolokas propose the creation of an Emergency Health Financing Facility (EHFF), which would limit the impact of a future crisis on the EU and its member States.
All articles