Search for tag 'Entrepreneurship'

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  1. Bumpy road to growth for European scale-ups

    The bumpy road to a successful scale-up: study of European scale-ups reveals 5 key challenges

    The widely held belief that European scale-ups are mainly innovative tech companies is incorrect; they can be found in all sectors and at all levels of innovation. However we can identify major differences between sectors in terms of size and growth, with scale-ups that are active in IT and consumer goods and services leading the way. Scale-ups with external investors on board are more professionally managed and have made greater progress in terms of internationalisation, innovation and talent management. All the same, attracting additional funding proves very difficult and hampers their further growth ambitions. These are some of the conclusions of the European Scale-Up Report, conducted by Vlerick Business School on behalf of Scale-Ups.eu.

  2. Attracting resources with soft claims

    Can you attract resources before you’ve proved your worth? Yes, you can!

    Start-ups and young businesses aiming for growth need resources - funding, staff, material, customers and so on. But why would anyone provide resources to a small business that has nothing concrete to show for it yet? How can you convince others if you haven’t yet proved your worth? A study by Professor Sophie Manigart and her colleagues show that what are known as ‘soft signals’ can be very useful in this situation.

  3. Rising Star Monitor 2019 - focus on corporate governance

    Young Belgian growth companies should pay more attention to their governing bodies

    A company’s Advisory Board and Board of Directors can have significant impacts on its performance. However, not so many young Belgian companies with growth potential have such governing bodies. Only 8% have Advisory Boards, and one in five have Boards of Directors. Although the compositions of the Boards of Directors are relatively diverse and complementary, only one in five has independent directors. Moreover, only 16% have a female presence; compared to the US (37%) or the UK (47%), women are under-represented on Belgian Boards of Directors. On the positive side, the Boards of Directors meet much more frequently than is generally recommended, which means that these young growth companies fully exploit their expertise. These are the main conclusions of the fourth edition of the Rising Star Monitor

  4. White Paper Vlerick - Business Planning

    The dos and don'ts of business planning

    When you consider pursuing a new business opportunity, it makes sense to assess the opportunity in a systematic way (rather than purely relying on gut feel). A business plan helps you structure your analyses and present them in a way to help others understand your plan – and hopefully agree with you.

  5. 822 firms are the driving force behind Belgian job creation

    A group of 822 high-growth firms accounts for one in three jobs created by private companies with a minimum of ten employees. These high-growth firms represent just 3.5% of Belgian businesses with a minimum of ten employees. A small minority of 3.5% of Belgian businesses with a minimum of ten employees is responsible for the creation of 45,947 jobs. This amounts to 67% of the total net number of jobs created by business with a minimum of ten employees in the period from 2014 to 2017. This is apparent from the results of the annual Belgian High-Growth Monitor.

  6. Start-ups with growth ambitions

    Young Belgian scale-ups consider the world their playground

    Young Belgian companies with ambitions to grow set the bar for growth higher and higher. These scale-ups do not shy away from taking the step to sell aboard, where they generate nearly 30 percent of their total turnover. They are growing smart and are doing so primarily through less risk and hybrid ways for growth, such as licences and strategic alliances. Finally, the average salary that the founders pay themselves has remained constant in the last three years. These are the most significant conclusions of the third edition of the Rising Star Monitor. This annual survey by the Vlerick Business School and Deloitte Belgium provides insight into the trends and challenges for young Belgian companies with growth potential.

  7. Start-up financing

    Financing a start-up is more complicated than you might imagine

    Co-authors Professor Sophie Manigart and Professor Miguel Meuleman explain why the handbook 'Entrepreneurial Finance, The Art and Science of Growing Ventures' is required reading for anyone who wants to know or learn more about the financing of start-ups in Europe.

  8. Rising Star Monitor

    Can Belgian start-ups conquer the world?

    Half of the organisations surveyed in the Rising Star Monitor, a report on the trends and challenges for young, high potential ventures in Belgium, intend to grow, but not always at very high speed. A second major finding refers to the fact that founders often forget to enter into a proper shareholder agreement, which is worrying as one in four founders leaves their company within the first three years. To support high-potential ventures in their path to rapid growth, attention should be paid to attracting potential employees in a more professional manner and providing existing employees with more feedback and a clearly defined career path.

  9. Web shop

    How to convince your online customers as a newcomer?

    A growing number of established companies are turning to e-commerce as an additional sales channel. Plenty of smaller start-ups, however, choose to set up only an online shop, without investing in physical points of sale. How can you convince first-time consumers to buy your products or services online, as an unfamiliar vendor? Are all kinds of guarantees sufficient? Or should you consider investing in a customer review module?

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