Search for tag 'Healthcare'

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  1. Horizon scanning in a demand-driven healthcare system

    Acting with foresight in times of budget austerity

    Horizon scanning is acknowledged to be one of the key components of a demand-driven healthcare system. In this Policy Paper we propose a two-stage structure and organisation of the back-end national part of the horizon scanning process still to be implemented. This will lead to healthcare budgets managed with better foresight, a necessity in the face of breakthrough, some potentially curing therapies coming at a high cost. Taking the Belgian national component of the proposed horizon scanning system to implementation will require a pilot to be carried out. This to test the internal and external validity of the proposed design.

  2. Gene therapy

    How to address the affordability challenge for advanced therapy medicinal products

    Advanced therapy medicinal products have the potential to offer a durable, life-changing therapeutic effect, possibly with a single administration, for patients who may have few or no alternative treatment options. However, our current Belgian healthcare system is not attuned to these breakthrough therapies, which require short-term substantial payment for potentially lifelong patient value. In collaboration with Inovigate and through dialogue with all stakeholders, Vlerick Business School presents a policy report that contains workable solutions for expensive but curing therapies.

  3. What is value-based healthcare?

    What is value-based healthcare?

    In this 'What Is' video, Healthcare Professor Brecht Cardoen and Finance Professor Filip Roodhooft explain what value-based healthcare is and what it means for the medical industry and the pharma industry.

  4. The importance of machine learning for oncology

    How do you analyse real-world data?

    There is a high demand for innovative cancer drugs. Yet their development is a complex and lengthy affair, longer and more expensive than that for conventional cancer treatments and with little chance of success. The drugs that do make it through need to be made available as soon as possible. The EMA (European Medicines Agency) has therefore created flexible forms of market authorisation, such as conditional authorisation and adaptive pathways. As speed must not come at the expense of safety, these drugs must be monitored even after they have been put into circulation. This is no easy task. Tine Geldof's doctorate demonstrates that advanced data analysis techniques such as machine learning may offer a solution.

  5. Multidisciplinary collaboration in drug discovery – how to make it work

    Drug development is a long and expensive process. On average it takes more than ten years to get a drug to market and precious few molecules coming out of the drug discovery phase make it to clinical trials. The performance of the discovery team and the choices they make, however, have a knock-on effect on the rest of the drug development process. Together with colleagues from academia and the industry, professor Zeynep Erden identified the conditions for effective cross-disciplinary collaboration and knowledge creation in drug discovery teams.

  6. Price of medication

    Medicines: how much should they cost?

    Although medical progress is allowing us to treat more and more diseases, innovative medicines tend to be expensive. Expenses are rising constantly in the healthcare sector as a result, putting accessibility and affordability under pressure. Which criteria does the Belgian Commission for Reimbursement of Medicines apply and what could be improved? These questions are answered in a study based on RIZIV data, in the framework of the Roche Chair at the Vlerick Healthcare Management Centre.

  7. White paper priorities in healthcare

    Setting Priorities in Healthcare

    Healthcare organisations are under growing pressure to give patients better outcomes and add value for all stakeholders. And in recent years, there has been an increase in innovation across the sector – with the arrival of emerging technologies and pharmaceutical advances that have the potential to enhance the lives of patients around the world.

  8. Hospital network formation

    Hospital networks: quo vadis?

    Hospitals are increasingly joining forces in networks of different types, sometimes with other healthcare players. This is an unmistakable trend, but forming networks is also an important strategic decision. How can hospitals ensure the right decisions are taken, both today and tomorrow, guaranteeing a robust, resilient and versatile organisation in the long run? Changes are rapidly succeeding one another, but who knows what healthcare will be like fifteen years from now and what the best set-up would be for these networks? No one can predict the future. However, despite all the uncertainties, a scenario analysis can help in the decision-making process.

  9. UCB

    Pharma and data as gospel

    Developing drugs is a time-consuming process. In order to speed it up, the Belgian biopharmaceuticals producer UCB has decided to switch to a data-driven organisation. It was necessary to ‘convert’ the entire company to achieve this, says CIO Herman De Prins.

  10. Innovative cancer treatments: how much are we willing to pay?

    One man in three and one woman in four will develop cancer before their 75th birthday. In Belgium, cancer is the second major cause of disease burden after cardiovascular diseases and it is unlikely this will change in the foreseeable future. Increasingly better but more expensive cancer therapies are becoming available. Needless to say, in these times of austerity, the public budget for cancer treatment is under pressure. How can we ensure all patients continue to have access to these expensive but potentially life-saving medicines at a price society can afford, while at the same time encouraging pharmaceutical companies to innovate?

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