Search for tag 'Entrepreneurship'

52 results Number of Results per Page
  1. High-growth entrepreneurial firms in Africa

    High-growth entrepreneurial firms in Africa

    This article analyses the growth performance of a number of entrepreneurial firms in 10 manufacturing sectors of 11 Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. The focus of the article is on identifying the entrepreneurial attributes and company characteristics that tend to generate a significant number of high-growth firms (HGFs) in these countries. The authors investigate to what extent certain co-variates may affect the conditional distribution of company growth rates more fundamentally. They focus not only on the factors that systematically increase the ‘mean’ growth rates of firms, but also on the factors that tend to stretch the right tail of the conditional distribution of growth rates – in other words, factors that tend to generate a significant number of high-growth firms.

  2. Business Angels lend a helping hand

    Business Angels lend a helping hand

    With an average age of 51 years, 19 years of managerial experience, 14 years as an entrepreneur – and, certainly, considerable financial resources – Business Angels are private individuals who invest in young companies that are not quoted on the Stock Exchange. As very young companies (or those that need only a small amount of funding) often find it difficult to attract venture capital, the BANs bring these companies in contact with BAs who help provide the necessary funds.

  3. Multinational

    Profiting from Modesty: a big global advantage for Flemish companies

    One of the most critical challenges facing entrepreneurial companies expanding abroad may also be one of the most subtle: fitting in. A failure to win acceptance both internationally but also with a parent company at home can slam the door on capital, technology, skilled labour and, above all, customers. Researchers call this quality of being seen as a trustworthy partner “legitimacy”, and a pioneering study of small and medium-sized enterprises emphasizes the crucial role it can play in cross-border expansion.

  4. Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM)

    The global scale of the GEM survey enables regions and countries to make comparisons with each other with regard to the new entrepreneurial climate. The GEM survey is unique in that it not only focuses on the number of persons that have founded a company but also on the number of persons that are in the process of starting a company that has not yet become a formal entity. Furthermore, the GEM examines the population’s perception regarding entrepreneurship. The worldwide study is coordinated and supervised by London Business School (UK) and Babson College (USA).

  5. Social Media

    Taking the Commodity Bull by the Horns. The Success of ThePCBShop.com

    This case describes the entrepreneurial process, as it happened for a manufacturer of Printed Circuit Boards. It exemplifies the interplay between lucrative opportunities, entrepreneurial team and resources; addresses the role of the global marketplace for entrepreneurs; highlights the successful shift by the manufacturer to electronic business to break the product commodity cycle, and puts forward franchising as a potential growth strategy.

  6. Green frontier

    They may be eco-friendly, but clean tech companies confront hostile markets. In order to prevail, they will need to attract customers prepared to pay more for a green product, perform better than competitors, or change the rules of the game.

  7. making students more entreprising

    Making Students More Enterprising, Does it Work?

    A large variety of initiatives are striving to stimulate the sense of entrepreneurship in students in secondary education − but do all these well-intentioned projects really make sense? The Effecto study from the Flanders DC Knowledge Centre at Vlerick Business School shows that these initiatives do indeed have an effect, although this can be further increased with small interventions. Moreover, other factors also play a definite role in stimulating entrepreneurship.

  8. Attention

    Growth companies during the financial crisis

    Growth companies in Flanders are not being affected financially by the crisis. Thanks to an effective approach, they are able to withstand the economic recession. That is the major conclusion of the large growth survey conducted by iGMO (Impulscentrum Groeimanagement voor Middelgrote Ondernemingen / Growth management impulse centre for mid-sized enterprises) at Vlerick Business School. The results are being presented during the iGMO Growth Management Summit 2009 on 18 and 19 June in Oostende. The research was supported by Ernst & Young and KBC.

  9. Group discussion

    Determinants of successful internationalisation by SMEs in Flanders

    Export companies are more resistant to crisis according to a study by Flanders DC. Small and medium sized firms (SMEs) internationalize not only to grow their business, but also to survive. Spreading activities across different countries make SMEs more resistant to the impact of an economic downturn.

  10. logo Flanders DC

    What makes an SME in Flanders successful on an international level?

    Export companies are more resistant to crisis according to a study by Flanders DC. Small and medium sized firms (SMEs) internationalize not only to grow their business, but also to survive. Spreading activities across different countries make SMEs more resistant to the impact of an economic downturn.

52 results Number of Results per Page