Vlerick Expertise in Innovation Management

 

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  1. Formula E

    Emotional tension as a catalyst for digital innovation

    Avoid tension, strive for consensus, get everyone facing in the same direction... That’s the secret to a successful organisation. Or is it? “Not if you want to make big bold bets like the Amazons and Googles of this world - radical digital innovations or disruptions, goods or services you never thought were possible”, Willem Standaert, lecturer at Vlerick, tells us. So how should you do it then? He joined forces with Sirkka Jarvenpaa, Professor at the McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas in Austin, to analyse Formula E, Formula 1’s little electric-powered brother, and find an answer to that question.

  2. Digipolis

    How Digipolis stimulates innovation through its procurement strategy

    Digipolis is the public non-profit body which provides IT services to various public institutions in Antwerp. In 2015, Digipolis realised that it was missing out on innovative solutions – generally from start-ups – as it often called upon large, traditional software players. A major strategic exercise ultimately led to a drastic redesign of their procurement strategy. The new strategy completely overturned the status quo and boosted the participation of innovative start-ups in public tenders and the purchase of more innovative solutions.

  3. Impact of cognition on strategic outcomes

    Strategy is daily fare

    “Change or die” is an often-heard battle cry in this age of digitisation and disruption. Ever more digital technologies are being developed and put onto the market. What strategy will you follow? Which business model will you adopt? How entrepreneurs and managers interpret this constantly changing digital environment determines their strategic choices. Caroline Baert’s doctoral thesis fills an important gap in strategic management research.

  4. Public procurement

    How can the public sector take a more innovative approach to procurement?

    Innovative procurement means using innovative procurement methods with the goal of streamlining the purchasing process and making it more efficient. The public sector in Belgium still does that too little, tending to cling to the traditional method. However, innovative procurement has two major benefits, being saving costs and stimulating innovation. For his ongoing doctoral research, Ben De Coninck has been studying the Belgian government’s position when it comes to innovative procurement.

  5. Ice fishing

    It ain’t what you do…

    Would you prefer your staff to go ice fishing or cast their nets on the high seas? It all depends on what you want to achieve as an organisation. In his doctoral thesis, Bart Verwaeren researched which fishing method leads to more radical innovation and how you can stimulate people to do things the way you want them to. Should you give your people bait or a boat?

  6. Capture the value you deserve

    The latest collaborative piece of research undertaken by PwC and Vlerick focuses on how companies engaged in ‘B2B2C’ relationships manage the power game with their channel partners. It questions how suppliers can reinvent their relationship with channel partners to spur profitable growth.

  7. The importance of cross-industry innovation in an inspiration-driven economy

    Whereas the growth of our economy used to be determined by efficiency, these days it is mostly driven by inspiration and creativity. Very often, it is not enough for companies to keep looking within the confines of their own company or even their own branch of industry. On behalf of Flanders DC, Vlerick Business School therefore examined what makes cross-industry innovation successful. In addition, the study was recently translated into the new, practical online tool innovatiefsamenwerken.be.

  8. 3D printing: a laboratory for business model research

    What should established companies do when an innovative – and potentially disruptive – new technology appears on the scene? Vlerick Business School and Sirris collaborated to develop a framework linking technology and business models. When applied to the subject of 3D printers, their model led to a number of surprising insights.

  9. Looking to economise on scientific research? Bad idea.

    “Innovation policy doesn’t always place sufficient emphasis on scientific research,” according to Professor Bart Leten. “It’s often assumed that education is the main way that knowledge institutions can affect the innovative performance of local businesses.” But is that really the case? Together with two colleagues, he has shown that scientific research does indeed support industrial innovation activities.

  10. What drives regional innovation in the EU?

    Prof Leo Sleuwaegen and researcher Priscilla Boiardi have published a paper that analyses EU regional patenting activity − a strong indicator of regional innovation − within a system of creative change driven by 4 fundamental factors: institutions, intelligence, infrastructure, and inspiration. Prof Leo Sleuwaegen: “We developed this paper from research that we conducted for the Flanders District of Creativity. In brief, we were investigating what makes regions creative in terms of innovation, and how Flanders is performing benchmarked against all the other regions in the EU.

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