Vlerick Expertise in Healthcare

 

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  1. Price transparency for innovative medicines does not result in lower prices for everyone

    Although it seems counterintuitive, a new simulation model shows that, without confidential price agreements, lower income countries will pay up to 12% higher prices and gain access to innovative medicines far later than richer countries. This conclusion goes against the assumption that total transparency about price agreements for new and innovative medicines for diseases with high unmet need would lead to more competition, lower prices for all, and greater availability of these medicines for more patients in more countries.

  2. European emergency health fund is needed to limit the impact of future crises

    The unprecedented public health crisis caused by COVID-19 overstretched the structures and mechanisms of the European Union, in particular those that deal with emergencies. There is a need for deeper union and collaboration across the European health care sector, as well as a need for a significant financial cushion for rapid and predictably increasing funding. In their new policy paper, Professor David Veredas, Professor Simon Ashby and doctoral researcher Dimitrios Kolokas propose the creation of an Emergency Health Financing Facility (EHFF), which would limit the impact of a future crisis on the EU and its member States.

  3. How to determine the hospital treatment costs for breast cancer patients?

    Healthcare costs are on the rise globally. And factors such as the increase in aging population, advancement in medical technology, and the current reimbursement system contribute to this rise. In addition, we see a lack of cost transparency and understanding centred around costs. A new study by doctoral researcher Erin Roman, Professor Brecht Cardoen and Professor Filip Roodhooft analyses the variability in treatment costs for breast cancer, using several patient and disease related factors, to better understand cost drivers.

  4. COVID-19 vaccines: What if we don’t have enough of them?

    Vaccines usually have complex manufacturing processes and long production lead times. It is likely that we will face acute shortages in the initial period after the vaccine is produced. We will then have to rely on good targeting and rationing strategies for the quantity of vaccines available. Traditional inventory management systems using backlog or underage costs are generally improper in the human life context. Research by Professor Behzad Samii weighs out other inventory allocation mechanisms.

  5. Flexibility is your best weapon to limit the damage from unforeseen, unexpected change

    How should we react best as a society, business or individual to the many challenges that the coronavirus poses? The extent of the impact is not only being felt in terms of health, but clearly also in the economy and society. According to Professor Brecht Cardoen, flexibility is the best weapon to limit the damage, irrespective of the change or the level at which the change is introduced. Putting flexibility into practice is most visible in the healthcare sector. However, it can also be a good strategy for other companies that are looking for suitable adjustments to the workplace.

  6. Horizon scanning in a demand-driven healthcare system

    Acting with foresight in times of budget austerity

    Horizon scanning is acknowledged to be one of the key components of a demand-driven healthcare system. In this Policy Paper we propose a two-stage structure and organisation of the back-end national part of the horizon scanning process still to be implemented. This will lead to healthcare budgets managed with better foresight, a necessity in the face of breakthrough, some potentially curing therapies coming at a high cost. Taking the Belgian national component of the proposed horizon scanning system to implementation will require a pilot to be carried out. This to test the internal and external validity of the proposed design.

  7. Gene therapy

    How to address the affordability challenge for advanced therapy medicinal products

    Advanced therapy medicinal products have the potential to offer a durable, life-changing therapeutic effect, possibly with a single administration, for patients who may have few or no alternative treatment options. However, our current Belgian healthcare system is not attuned to these breakthrough therapies, which require short-term substantial payment for potentially lifelong patient value. In collaboration with Inovigate and through dialogue with all stakeholders, Vlerick Business School presents a policy report that contains workable solutions for expensive but curing therapies.

  8. Healthcare Management Centre Research Report 2019

    Healthcare Management Centre - annual research report 2019

    In 2019, we conclude the fifth year of Vlerick Healthcare Management Centre’s operations. Building upon a strong MINOZ legacy of studying hospital operations, we continue to expand and deepen our reach into the full healthcare system. This annual research report gives an overview of achievements and published output.

  9. What is value-based healthcare?

    What is value-based healthcare?

    In this 'What Is' video, Healthcare Professor Brecht Cardoen and Finance Professor Filip Roodhooft explain what value-based healthcare is and what it means for the medical industry and the pharma industry.

  10. The importance of machine learning for oncology

    How do you analyse real-world data?

    There is a high demand for innovative cancer drugs. Yet their development is a complex and lengthy affair, longer and more expensive than that for conventional cancer treatments and with little chance of success. The drugs that do make it through need to be made available as soon as possible. The EMA (European Medicines Agency) has therefore created flexible forms of market authorisation, such as conditional authorisation and adaptive pathways. As speed must not come at the expense of safety, these drugs must be monitored even after they have been put into circulation. This is no easy task. Tine Geldof's doctorate demonstrates that advanced data analysis techniques such as machine learning may offer a solution.

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