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Research – either academic or research for business – can only be valuable when shared. That’s why we translate our research into easy-to-read management articles focusing on the key insights that are relevant for you as a manager. You can select articles according to your personal interest via the knowledge domains in the menu. Enjoy your read!

New Articles

  1. Millennials still have high expectations of employment market, but Covid-19 dampens optimism

    The expectations final-year students have of their first job are still high. Good communication with their colleagues, a sociable atmosphere and plenty of opportunities for training are at the top of the list. What is more, these millennials prioritise career security over job security. They consider their relationship with their first employer to be temporary, expecting to work for a whole range of different companies during their working life. However, the Covid-19 outbreak has toned down their optimism about the future. Now afraid that fewer jobs will be available to suit their skills and qualifications, they are once again attaching greater importance to job security.

  2. Fast-growing companies serve as a beacon of employment during the coronavirus storm

    Fast-growing businesses are known as the engine of job creation. The 2020 Belgian High Growth Monitor shows that 920 fast-growing companies were responsible for 52,779 new jobs. Although these figures reveal that Belgium is doing less well than the European average, this group of healthy Belgian ‘gazelles’ does show stability. Over the years they have created around 50,000 jobs during each growth period. A hopeful sign, especially now that many companies are having trouble keeping their heads above water.

  3. Strategy in turbulent times - how to survive a crisis and bounce back

    For some sectors, it is difficult to see the COVID-19 crisis as anything other than a threat. However, some companies have also made some very bold moves. In this white paper, Vlerick strategy experts have joined forces to reflect on the implications of the pandemic for businesses, to share best practices on how to deal with the current situation in the short term, and to offer methods and advice on how to build a strategy for the new normal.

  4. Variable remuneration for top managers may have negative impact on profit

    If companies want to boost their short-term profitability, the best way to do it is to grant a high remuneration level and commit strongly to incentives such as bonuses and share-related reward schemes. It is striking, however, that this has a boomerang effect on the company’s longer-term financial performance. As it turns out, high variable pay and a strong emphasis on profitability criteria have a negative impact on company profits. This is a remarkable finding in the annual survey of top salaries by the Executive Remuneration Research Centre.

  5. European emergency health fund is needed to limit the impact of future crises

    The unprecedented public health crisis caused by COVID-19 overstretched the structures and mechanisms of the European Union, in particular those that deal with emergencies. There is a need for deeper union and collaboration across the European health care sector, as well as a need for a significant financial cushion for rapid and predictably increasing funding. In their new policy paper, Professor David Veredas, Professor Simon Ashby and doctoral researcher Dimitrios Kolokas propose the creation of an Emergency Health Financing Facility (EHFF), which would limit the impact of a future crisis on the EU and its member States.

  6. Only 38% of entrepreneurs starting high potential ventures also have high growth ambitions

    The 2020 Rising Star Monitor reveals that about one in two high-growth ventures are entirely internally funded. Over 90 percent of young, high-potential ventures which had not used external funding did not even apply for it. About three in four ventures do not do so because they believe they do not need it. Beyond that, entrepreneurs don’t apply for bank financing because they don’t think they have enough financial history, they see the application process for subsidies as too cumbersome, fear losing control with venture capitalists and angels, and they consider crowdfunding as too time consuming.

  7. Europe's electricity markets: why they are the way they are

    The title of Professor Leonardo Meeus’ new book speaks for itself. ‘The Evolution of Electricity Markets in Europe’ describes the evolution of the electricity market since liberalisation began in the late 1990s. What have the most significant challenges been? What solutions were found and how have these solutions led to new problems that needed new solutions of their own?

  8. What is... your reflected best self?

    We often get the advice to just be ourselves. However, it requires a large amount of self-knowledge to know who you are authentically. Your reflected best self is your individual mental picture of the qualities and characteristics that are on display when you are at your best. But how do you construct this mental picture? And what are the trigger events that contain new pieces of information to add to the picture? Professor and Dean Marion Debruyne explains.

  9. How to determine the hospital treatment costs for breast cancer patients?

    Healthcare costs are on the rise globally. And factors such as the increase in aging population, advancement in medical technology, and the current reimbursement system contribute to this rise. In addition, we see a lack of cost transparency and understanding centred around costs. A new study by doctoral researcher Erin Roman, Professor Brecht Cardoen and Professor Filip Roodhooft analyses the variability in treatment costs for breast cancer, using several patient and disease related factors, to better understand cost drivers.

  10. 10 key findings on performance and reward management in an agile environment

    Agility is an emerging key dimension of business excellence. Yet, many organisations are still struggling with implementing agile approaches in the area of performance and reward management. That’s why the Centre for Excellence in Strategic Talent Management, the Centre for Excellence in Strategic Rewards and Chair partner Hudson joined forces for a new study that results in 10 key findings, each representing a phenomenon, trend or influence currently playing in agile working contexts.

  11. What is... the competency trap?

    Is it better to invest in further developing and refining your strengths, or should you go for the tough track and overcome your weaknesses? Most of us prefer the former. Because it feels so much better to further develop what you are already good at. But by overinvesting in our strengths, we also take less time to learn other important new skills. Professor Katleen De Stobbeleir explains how to overcome this so-called competency trap.

  12. What is... the importance of trust between machines and people?

    When employees resist a new technology, one of the reasons is often the lack of trust towards machines and systems. That kind of trust is different from the trust we experience between people, as kindness and warmth are characteristics that machines lack. Research by Professor Karlien Vanderheyden on planners and planning systems shows which factors can help building more trust towards machines.

  13. Only six out of 100 Belgian companies are satisfied with the current income tax system

    Belgian companies are very dissatisfied with the fiscal and parafiscal levies on salaries. In particular, they are frustrated with the high taxation on fixed and variable salaries and the approach to taxation of the mobility budget. Only the taxation of supplementary pensions can count on any support. With a view to the future, many companies are arguing for extensive reforms, with as the basic principle a downscaling of the profusion of fiscal and parafiscal schemes for non-statutory benefits in combination with lower levies on the fundamental elements, and in particular, the fixed and variable salaries. These are the main findings of a detailed study by Professor Xavier Baeten on the taxation and social security of various remuneration tools.

  14. Digital talent markets promote internal mobility

    In these turbulent times, it is more important than ever for organisations to have the right person in the right place at the right time. However, it is also good for employees to change roles regularly within the organisation: this gives them the opportunity to develop, learn new things and work with new people. In his PhD, Philip Rogiers investigated how the internal mobility of employees could be further improved. Although he studied this in a government context, his conclusions apply to all kinds of organisations.

  15. What is... Explainable Artificial Intelligence?

    Planning systems are increasingly powered by Artificial Intelligence, making demand plans and forecasts more accurate, and supply chain plans more reliable. However, the more complex these systems are, the more difficult it is for humans to understand the output that is generated by the system, and to accept the proposed decisions. The lack of transparency causes our trust in the system to suffer. Professor Ann Vereecke shows how Explainable artificial intelligence is specifically designed to prevent this black box phenomenon from happening.

  16. The blinded society: do we really need a catastrophe to make progress?

    How does a society learn? And most importantly, why do we so often learn the wrong things? What blinds us? These are questions that are asked surprisingly little. In this book, organisational expert and emeritus professor Marc Buelens presents a razor-sharp analysis of how societies shoot themselves in the foot all too often. He explains how the three draught horses of our society – science, economics and politics – always seem to keep trotting on no matter what… and how they threaten to trample our ‘sheltered’ systems, such as culture, purpose and solidarity, completely as a result.

  17. Supply chain planning in the digital age

    With new, digital technologies entering the factories and the supply chain, the role of people in manufacturing and logistics is undeniably changing. Existing tasks are disappearing or changing, new tasks are emerging. But what about the planning function? How is this function being impacted by the introduction of digital technologies – and, in particular, artificial intelligence – making the planning system more advanced? This report summarises insights from interviews with decision-makers in multinational manufacturing companies.

  18. You determine your own path to success

    The only way is up; you create your own career; and leaders are born, not made. These are just three of the fifteen persistent myths that Professor Marion Debruyne and Professor Katleen De Stobbeleir expertly unravel in ‘Making your way, the (wobbly) road to success and happiness in life and work’, a book that everyone can and should read.

  19. The public sector: the natural home for vested digital leadership

    Today, the government has to rein in a health crisis on the one hand, and has to compensate for its economic impact on the other. The crisis is acting as a catalyst on top of the evolution that the sector is going through, a transformation that should serve to make the respective organisations in the sector proactive, agile machines in which new digital and organisational models play a key role. In the midst of this transformation, the need for vested digital leadership is greater than ever. LoQutus and Vlerick Business School have joined forces to explore the way in which the public sector is experiencing the changes, how it is tackling them, and where the main obstacles lie.

  20. Does imitation pay when auditing companies?

    Despite their thorough preliminary training, junior accountants often lack the knowledge and experience required to apply the law and auditing standards correctly in practice. That is why they are supervised during audit assignments by an experienced senior who gives them coaching. What role does imitation play in the relationship between the junior and senior accountant?